How Wearing a Social Justice Lens Can Support You, Your Clients, and the Larger Community: An Intersectionality Workshop With a Twist

Authors

  • Melissa Jay Athabasca University
  • Jason Brown Western University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47634/cjcp.v55i3.70980

Abstract

Counsellors may not comprehend fully the impact of their blind spots as a result of unconscious cultural encapsulation. The authors propose a self-reflective method by which counsellors can self-examine their assumptions about diversity and intersectionality. They invite readers to engage with the contents of this article to identify their blind spots, biases, and assumptions through self-reflective exercises. This article summarizes an intersectionality workshop with a twist that was offered by Melissa Jay, Jason Brown, and Rebecca Ward at the 2019 conference of the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association. The intention of the workshop was (a) to raise consciousness about systemic oppression, (b) to explore Collins’s (2018c) culturally responsive and socially just case conceptualization as the framework for the workshop, (c) to bring client intersectionality to life using four vignettes they created, (d) to reflect on client intersectionality and cultural identity, and (e) to propose a method by which counsellors can self-examine their assumptions about diversity and intersectionality, leading to more culturally competent counselling.

Author Biographies

Melissa Jay, Athabasca University

Melissa Jay (she/her) is a Nehiyaw member of the Métis Nation of Alberta, an assistant professor at Athabasca University, and a registered psychologist in the province of Alberta. Her research interests include trauma-informed approaches integrating modern psychology, ancient wisdom traditions, and community care. She is also the current Indigenous director for the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association.

Jason Brown, Western University

Jason Brown (he/him) is a settler, a psychologist, and a professor at Western University with interests in strengths-based approaches to mental health. Recently he has been involved in research with foster families, newcomer families, Indigenous youth, and service providers as well as families of individuals affected by prenatal alcohol exposure. Jason is interested in anti-oppressive practice as well as applications of a mixed-method approach to research called concept mapping.

Published

2021-12-03

How to Cite

Jay, M., & Brown, J. (2021). How Wearing a Social Justice Lens Can Support You, Your Clients, and the Larger Community: An Intersectionality Workshop With a Twist. Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy, 55(3), 396–409. https://doi.org/10.47634/cjcp.v55i3.70980

Issue

Section

Articles/ Articles