A Content Analysis of Gendered Research in the Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy

  • Robinder P. Bedi Western Washington University
  • Courtney N. Young Western Washington University
  • Jaleh A. Davari Western Washington University
  • Karen L. Springer Western Washington University
  • Daniel P. Kane Western Washington University
Keywords: male, men, boys, gender, content analysis

Abstract

There is increased awareness of but limited quantification of the lack of published scholarship about boys and men in counselling. We conducted a content analysis on articles published in the Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy from 2000 to 2013 to examine gender differences in research participants and to explore the topics published. After reviewing 293 articles, we found that female-topic-specific articles outnumbered male-topic-specific articles by 3:1 and research studies based on exclusively female client/ student samples outnumbered those based on exclusively male samples by about 4:1. When examining only gender-specific articles that were intentionally seeking to look at a particular gender—not including the four articles in Vol. 46, No. 4 (2012), the special issue on boys/men—the ratio of female-specific articles to male-specific articles is about 5:1; for research studies that ratio is about 15:1. This leaves clinicians with a small Canadian research base from which to provide gender-sensitive and evidence-based interventions with boys/men.

Author Biographies

Robinder P. Bedi, Western Washington University
Dr. Robinder (Rob) P. Bedi in an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Western Washington University, where his primary teaching responsibilities are in abnormal psychology and in the counseling programs. He is also a registered psychologist in British Columbia, where he maintains a small private practice.
Courtney N. Young, Western Washington University
Courtney N. Young graduated from Western Washington University with a Bachelor's degree in Psychology. She intends on receiving her master's degree in clinical psychology and chemical dependency professional (CDP) certificate. Courtney also has experience at Catholic Community Services working with an adult dual-diagnosis mental health and substance abuse population.
Jaleh A. Davari, Western Washington University
Jaleh A. Davari is a graduate student in the Department of Counselor Education at Gonzaga University, where she is completing her M.A. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. She is also simultaneously pursuing certification towards becoming a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA), and intends to obtain a doctorate in clinical psychology. Jaleh's research interests include the mental health of children and adolescents, in particular aspects of early intervention, testing, and assessment.
Karen L. Springer, Western Washington University
Karen L. Springer is a graduate student in the Department of Psychology at Western Washington University. She is completing her M.S. in Experimental Psychology and conducting her Thesis research under the advisement of Rob Bedi, PhD. Her primary interests include psychotherapy, the therapeutic relationship, emotion regulation, developmental psychopathology, depression, and addiction recovery.
Daniel P. Kane, Western Washington University
Daniel P. Kane is a graduate from Western Washington University with a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology. He intends to earn a doctorate in clinical neuropsychology. Currently he is a patient care coordinator for the Amen Clinic in Bellevue; which specializes in psychiatric treatment based on neuroimaging. Daniel also contributes to patient research at the Amen Clinic.
Published
2016-11-18
How to Cite
Bedi, R. P., Young, C. N., Davari, J. A., Springer, K. L., & Kane, D. P. (2016). A Content Analysis of Gendered Research in the Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy. Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy, 50(4). Retrieved from https://cjc-rcc.ucalgary.ca/article/view/61044
Section
Articles/ Articles