Career Transition of Immigrant Young People: Narratives of Success

Authors

  • William Borgen University of British Columbia
  • Marla Buchanan University of British Columbia
  • Deepak Mathew Trinity Western University
  • Ria Nishikawara University of British Columbia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47634/cjcp.v55i1.69129

Abstract

While a high unemployment rate is documented among immigrant young people, research also suggests that they experience success with career decision-making despite challenging circumstances (Hofferth & Moon, 2016). This study explored the career decision-making narratives of nine young people between the ages of 25 and 35 who had come to Canada when they were between the ages of 13 and 17 and who self-define as doing well in their career decision-making. Using a narrative research design, individual narrative accounts were constructed and analyzed using a thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006). The six themes that emerged from participant responses were (a) parental and family influences, (b) networking, making connections, and mentorship, (c) personal and workplace challenges, (d) peer influences, (e) the value of education, internships, and volunteering, and (f) the importance of rewarding, fulfilling work and pursuing one’s passion. Implications for career counselling practice, research, and career theory development are discussed.

Author Biographies

William Borgen, University of British Columbia

William Borgen is a professor in counselling psychology in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education (ECPS) at the University of British Columbia. His research interest is in career/life transitions. He is a registered psychologist in BC and in Alberta.

Marla Buchanan, University of British Columbia

Marla Buchanan is a professor in counselling psychology in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education (ECPS) at the University of British Columbia. Her interests include studies in traumatic stress and narrative research methods.

Deepak Mathew, Trinity Western University

Deepak Mathew is an assistant professor in counselling psychology at Trinity Western University. His area of research interest is in career development and life transitions.

Ria Nishikawara, University of British Columbia

Ria Nishikawara’s research interests include chronic pain, traumatic stress, and occupational health. She is a registered clinical counsellor in British Columbia.

Published

2021-01-14

How to Cite

Borgen, W., Buchanan, M., Mathew, D., & Nishikawara, R. (2021). Career Transition of Immigrant Young People: Narratives of Success. Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy, 55(1), 158–182. https://doi.org/10.47634/cjcp.v55i1.69129