Long-Term Outcomes of a Brief Emotion-Focused Family Therapy Intervention for Eating Disorders Across the Lifespan: A Mixed-Methods Study

  • Patricia Nash Eating Disorder Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador, St. John's, Newfoundland
  • Marika Renelli Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario
  • Amanda Stillar University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta
  • Breeanna Streich Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario
  • Adele Lafrance Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario

Abstract

Emotion-focused family therapy (EFFT) empowers caregivers to support their loved one’s eating disorder (ED) recovery. Data were collected over time from 74 caregivers who participated in a 2-day EFFT workshop. Results revealed positive outcomes related to self-efficacy, treatment engagement fears, and the accommodation and enabling of behaviours. A thematic analysis of interviews conducted with eight caregivers identified the following themes: (a) increasing self-efficacy with emotion, (b) working through emotion blocks, (c) strengthening interpersonal relationships, (d) experiencing togetherness among participants, and (e) benefiting from experiential practice via role-play. Results suggest this brief intervention is associated with positive caregiver outcomes that can be maintained over time.

Author Biographies

Patricia Nash, Eating Disorder Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador, St. John's, Newfoundland
MA
Marika Renelli, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario

Department of Psychology

MSc, MA

Amanda Stillar, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta

Department of Education

PhD, R.Psych

Breeanna Streich, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario

Department of Psychology

MA

Adele Lafrance, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario

Department of Psychology

PhD, C.Psych

Published
2020-04-14
How to Cite
Nash, P., Renelli, M., Stillar, A., Streich, B., & Lafrance, A. (2020). Long-Term Outcomes of a Brief Emotion-Focused Family Therapy Intervention for Eating Disorders Across the Lifespan: A Mixed-Methods Study. Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy, 54(2), 130-149. Retrieved from https://cjc-rcc.ucalgary.ca/article/view/62846
Section
Articles/ Articles