Self-Care Strategies and Barriers among Female Service Providers Working with Female Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

  • Taslim Alani Lakehead University
  • Mirella Stroink Lakehead University
Keywords: self-care, burnout prevention, vicarious trauma

Abstract

Research has made several links between work-related stress and emotional exhaustion or burnout. What have been less often explored are what strategies are used and the perceived benefits of self-care among individuals. The present study sought to better understand the perceived value of self-care and how it is employed in a sample of female service providers working with female survivors of domestic violence. Participants (n = 7) included women who work in a variety of mental health and supportive counselling roles. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis and led to the identification of 14 themes related to how well-being is affected by counsellors’ work, barriers to their self-care, and self-care strategies. Implications of the findings are included within the article.

Author Biographies

Taslim Alani, Lakehead University

Doctoral Student in Clinical Psychology

Lakehead University

Mirella Stroink, Lakehead University

Associate Professor

Department of Psychology

Lakehead University

Published
2015-10-02
How to Cite
Alani, T., & Stroink, M. (2015). Self-Care Strategies and Barriers among Female Service Providers Working with Female Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence. Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy, 49(4). Retrieved from https://cjc-rcc.ucalgary.ca/article/view/61051
Section
Articles/ Articles